Der Verwundete (The Wounded) by Arno Breker

Der Verwundete (The Wounded) by Arno Breker

heartbloodspirit:

Arno Breker | Der Rufer

heartbloodspirit:

Arno Breker | Der Rufer

postmortemfetalextrusion:


Wotans erwachen by Wolfgang von Shemm.

postmortemfetalextrusion:

Wotans erwachen by Wolfgang von Shemm.

derwiduhudar:


January 9, Day  of remembrance of  Raud the Strong
Raud the Strong was a Gothi and seafaring warrior, who resisted conversion to Christianity in the late 10th century CE.
Olaf Tryggvason was King of Norway from 995 to 1000 CE. He played an important part in the conversion of the Vikings to Christianity. Olaf traveled to the parts of Norway that had been under the rule of the King of Denmark. He demanded that the citizenry be baptized, and most reluctantly agreed. Those that did not were tortured or killed. Despite King Olaf’s persuasive efforts, many of the Vikings were reluctant to renounce their Gods and adopt Christianity. New and increasingly painful tortures and executions were devised by Olaf and his men. One of the most famous incidents of recalcitrance to Olaf’s attempts at coerced conversion to Christianity is that of Raud the Strong.
Raud the Strong was a large landowner, a leader-priest of Seiðr (an Old Norse term for a type of sorcery or witchcraft that was practiced by the pre-Christian Norse), and a sea-farer. Raud was known for his beautiful longship, a boat larger than any of Olaf’s, with a dragon’s head carved into the bow. The ship was called “The Dragon” or “The Serpent.” Raud the Strong, who also had the reputation of being a wizard, was defeated by Olaf in a sea battle. He escaped on his vessel, using the technique of sailing against the wind, which was a sailing technique unusual in northern European waters at that time. Raud outran Olaf and escaped to his settlement in Gylling and Haering, a part of the Godey Isles.
After the weather calmed, Olaf sailed under cover of darkness to Godey and seized Raud from his bed. Then the king told Raud that if he accepted Christian baptism, he could keep his lands and ship and the king would be his friend.
But Raud refused, saying he would never believe in Christ, and mocked Olaf’s religion and deity. Olaf became incensed and said Raud should die a horrible death. The king ordered him to be bound to a beam of wood, with his face pointed upward, and a round pin of wood put between his teeth to force his mouth open. The king then ordered a snake to be put into Raud’s mouth, but the snake would not go in. Olaf then ordered a drinking horn to be put into Raud’s mouth, and forced the serpent to go in by holding a red-hot iron at the opening of the horn. As a result, the snake crept into Raud’s mouth and down his throat, and gnawed its way out his side and Raud died.
Olaf seized Raud’s gold and silver, weapons and many valuable artifacts. All the men who were with Raud were baptized, or, if they refused, were killed or tortured. The king also took the dragonship that Raud had owned, and steered it himself since it was a much larger than any ship the he had.
According to legend this is how the famous Viking ships got their distinctive shape.

derwiduhudar:

January 9, Day  of remembrance of  Raud the Strong

Raud the Strong was a Gothi and seafaring warrior, who resisted conversion to Christianity in the late 10th century CE.

Olaf Tryggvason was King of Norway from 995 to 1000 CE. He played an important part in the conversion of the Vikings to Christianity. Olaf traveled to the parts of Norway that had been under the rule of the King of Denmark. He demanded that the citizenry be baptized, and most reluctantly agreed. Those that did not were tortured or killed. Despite King Olaf’s persuasive efforts, many of the Vikings were reluctant to renounce their Gods and adopt Christianity. New and increasingly painful tortures and executions were devised by Olaf and his men. One of the most famous incidents of recalcitrance to Olaf’s attempts at coerced conversion to Christianity is that of Raud the Strong.

Raud the Strong was a large landowner, a leader-priest of Seiðr (an Old Norse term for a type of sorcery or witchcraft that was practiced by the pre-Christian Norse), and a sea-farer. Raud was known for his beautiful longship, a boat larger than any of Olaf’s, with a dragon’s head carved into the bow. The ship was called “The Dragon” or “The Serpent.” Raud the Strong, who also had the reputation of being a wizard, was defeated by Olaf in a sea battle. He escaped on his vessel, using the technique of sailing against the wind, which was a sailing technique unusual in northern European waters at that time. Raud outran Olaf and escaped to his settlement in Gylling and Haering, a part of the Godey Isles.

After the weather calmed, Olaf sailed under cover of darkness to Godey and seized Raud from his bed. Then the king told Raud that if he accepted Christian baptism, he could keep his lands and ship and the king would be his friend.

But Raud refused, saying he would never believe in Christ, and mocked Olaf’s religion and deity. Olaf became incensed and said Raud should die a horrible death. The king ordered him to be bound to a beam of wood, with his face pointed upward, and a round pin of wood put between his teeth to force his mouth open. The king then ordered a snake to be put into Raud’s mouth, but the snake would not go in. Olaf then ordered a drinking horn to be put into Raud’s mouth, and forced the serpent to go in by holding a red-hot iron at the opening of the horn. As a result, the snake crept into Raud’s mouth and down his throat, and gnawed its way out his side and Raud died.

Olaf seized Raud’s gold and silver, weapons and many valuable artifacts. All the men who were with Raud were baptized, or, if they refused, were killed or tortured. The king also took the dragonship that Raud had owned, and steered it himself since it was a much larger than any ship the he had.

According to legend this is how the famous Viking ships got their distinctive shape.

Some Velvet Morning - Nancy Sinatra & Lee Hazelwood

derwiduhudar:

National Socialist kettlebell

1939 Naturist nude male with Kettlebell Germany 

 Kettlebell is an exerciser that has been used since ancient times by different peoples (Greeks, Romans, Egyptians, Chinese, Russian etc.). These kettlebell (or dormice in Russian) were not like our modern but were jars filled with water or land which were used to improve the physical athletes or soldiers of the time. In more modern times we can find in 1706 which is the date of the first Russian dictionary in which the word is found. The shape of the kettlebell (Girevoy) was not shaped like a cannonball, but only in 1797 it became a form of cannon ball on the orders of Tsar

Photographer:  Kurt Reichert (Germany) - internationally renown and historically significant German photographer who specialized in outdoor naturist nude studies - one of the main figures in the government promoted naturist/nudist movement in 1930’s Germany. Reichert’s engaging imagery helped pioneer the genre of outdoor nude photography depicting the naturist family lifestyle.
Subject:  Outdoor Male Fitness Nude throwing weight - classic and iconic full frontal nude image set by Reichert. Referenced on page 153 in “The Male Nude” by David Leddick. This vintage photogravure was one of the first full color outdoor naturist nude studies ever produced in Germany.
Date Of Negatives:  circa mid 1930’s