nornasmatte:

Happy summer solstice!

nornasmatte:

Happy summer solstice!

The starting-point given to the year that one can call normal, as being in direct conformity with primordial tradition, is the winter solstice
René Guénon, Traditional Forms and Cosmic Cycles, p. 24 (via vandrare)
siggautr:

Cover art for “Death’s Crown is Victory”, by Solstice. 

siggautr:

Cover art for “Death’s Crown is Victory”, by Solstice. 

Brachmond

derwiduhudar:

The HEIDENTOR(Heathen’s Gate)

The Heidentor, Austria’s best-known Roman monument and landmark of the Archaeological Park Carnuntum, is situated about 2 km from the Open Air Museum Petronell. You can also easily reach the Heidentor by car.

After your inspiring journey back to the everyday life of Carnuntum citizens, you will be impressed by this imposing monument to Imperial might. This massive building was situated outside the city walls over the Imperial statue of Emperor Constantius II, and visibly demonstrated to all travellers the splendour and might of the Roman imperator.

All that remains now of the former splendid edifice is the famous archway. Latest scientific investigations clearly prove that it was originally erected as a quadrifrons (Greek tetrapylon), a monument with pillars and four archways, which was built from 354 to 361 AD as a triumphal arch in honour of Emperor Constantius II and which rose protectively over the statue of the Emperor.

The name ‘Heidentor’ dates from the Middle Ages when the archway was thought to have been erected by non-Christians and was therefore called ‘heydnisch Tor’ (heathen gate). A misconception as we now know: the Heidentor was erected in a period when Christianity had been a recognised religion for decades and when it had become increasingly important in Carnuntum.

Guido Karl Anton List, better known as Guido von List (October 5, 1848 – May 17, 1919) was an Austrian/German (Viennese) poet, journalist, writer, businessman and dealer of leather goods, mountaineer, hiker, dramatist, playwright, and rower, but was most notable as an occultist and völkisch author who is seen as one of the most important figures in Germanic revivalism, Germanic mysticism, Runic Revivalism and Runosophy in the late 19th century and early 20th century, and continues to be so today.

List called his doctrine “Armanism” (after the Armanen, supposedly the heirs of the sun-king, a body of priest-kings in the ancient Ario-Germanic nation). Armanism was concerned with the esoteric doctrines of the gnosis (distinct from the exoteric doctrine intended for the lower social classes, Wotanism).

List also engaged in active celebratory ritual work. He would perform various rituals that sometimes seemed quite impromptu. The most famous depiction of such an event is his celebration of the summer solstice on 24 June 1875 at the ruins of the Roman City of Carnuntum. For this - as for so much else - we are dependent on List’s own somewhat fictionalised account, first published in Vienna in 1881. Basically, the ritual elements of this outing included the arduous task of gaining access to the so-called Heidentor (“Heathen Gate”) of the city (which List mystically identified as the gate from which a German army set out to conquer Rome in 375 C.E.), the drinking of ritual toasts to the memory of the local spirit ( genius loci ) and the heroes of the past, the lighting of a solstice fire, and the laying of eight wine bottles in the shape of the “fyrfos” (Swastika) in the glowing embers of the fire. List and his company then awaited the dawn.
These early experiences were sometimes later more completely fictionalised, as, for example, in his visionary tale “Eine Zaubernacht” (A Night of Magic). In this account, the persona (List) succeeds in invoking from the great mound a divine seeress ( Hechsa ) who reveals to him that he is not to be the liberator of the Germans - but that despite this “the German folk has need of the skald.”

Picture: An ‘Armanist pilgrimage’ to the Heidentor , Carnuntum, June 1911 from the book by Guido von List called Deutsch-Mythologische Landschaftsbilder. List is third from left.



Damh the Bard - Noon of the Solstice
19 plays

Solstice of the Sunflower - Paul Nash, 1945

“Solstice of the Sunflower” is one of the last oil paintings Paul Nash completed before his death in 1946. Admired for its formal boldness and visionary qualities, it was part of a series of sunflower works inspired by his reading of Sir James Frazer’s “The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion”. Nash described the subject of this painting: “The spent Sun shines from its zenith encouraging the Sunflower in the dual role of sun and firewheel to perform its mythological purpose. The Sun appears to be whipping the Sunflower like a top. The Sunflower Wheel tears over the hill cutting a path through the standing corn and bounding into the air as it gains momentum. This is the blessing of the Midsummer Fire.”

Nash was reading James Frazer’s collection of international folklore, The Golden Bough (1926) which tells the story of an old European Midsummer festival where burning ‘firewheels’ were rolled down a hill to imitate the course of the sun in the sky. Nash found a rich source of imagery in these stories of mystical rituals associated with the land, as well as inspiration from William Blake’s well-known poem ‘Ah! Sunflower’.

Solstice of the Sunflower - Paul Nash, 1945

“Solstice of the Sunflower” is one of the last oil paintings Paul Nash completed before his death in 1946. Admired for its formal boldness and visionary qualities, it was part of a series of sunflower works inspired by his reading of Sir James Frazer’s “The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion”. Nash described the subject of this painting: “The spent Sun shines from its zenith encouraging the Sunflower in the dual role of sun and firewheel to perform its mythological purpose. The Sun appears to be whipping the Sunflower like a top. The Sunflower Wheel tears over the hill cutting a path through the standing corn and bounding into the air as it gains momentum. This is the blessing of the Midsummer Fire.”

Nash was reading James Frazer’s collection of international folklore, The Golden Bough (1926) which tells the story of an old European Midsummer festival where burning ‘firewheels’ were rolled down a hill to imitate the course of the sun in the sky. Nash found a rich source of imagery in these stories of mystical rituals associated with the land, as well as inspiration from William Blake’s well-known poem ‘Ah! Sunflower’.

In three pictures the flower stands in the blue sky in place of the sun. But in the ‘Solstice’ the spent sun shines forth from its zenith encouraging the sunflower in the dual character of sun and firewheel to perform its mythological purpose.
Paul Nash
:Of The Wand & The Moon: - Summer Solstice
59 plays
Sonne Hagal - Midsummernight
119 plays
derwiduhudar:

Best wishes for summer solstice and a Happy MidSummer festival.

derwiduhudar:

Best wishes for summer solstice and a Happy MidSummer festival.